What I can do for you

Traditional Chinese Medicine aims to heal through a holistic combination of therapies, including acupuncture, herbal medicine, cupping, Gua Sha, Tui Na massage, dietary therapy, exercise and lifestyle choices. Traditional Chinese medicine focuses on maintenance of the balance and optimal energy that are essential to good health.

Acupuncture

Accepted all over the world today and recognized by the World Health Organization as an effective treatment for a wide range of health problems.

Infertility

Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine can be used as an effective treatment for couples that are having difficulty conceiving.

Chinese Herbal Medicine

With this sophisticated system, herbs can be chosen in combinations to specifically address each patient’s unique presentation and constitution.

Cupping

A therapy designed to stimulate the flow of blood and Qi within the superficial muscle layers.

Gua Sha

A technique used to release muscle tension, tightness and constriction. A rounded tool is used to gently scrape or rub the skin over a problem area.

Tui Na

A massage technique used to relieve muscle pain, tension and inflammation, and to heal injury.

Heat Therapy

Used to warm the acupuncture points in order to enhance the healing process for certain conditions.

Facial Rejuvenation Acupuncture

We treat the underlying conditions that may be affecting your skin and your aging process, you can expect to feel better overall.

Acupuncture

At the heart of Traditional Chinese Medicine is Acupuncture, accepted all over the world today and recognized by the World Health Organization as an effective treatment for a wide range of health problems.

Acupuncture has evolved into a complete holistic medical system and has been used to help people get well and stay healthy for thousands of years.

Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin, sterile needles into the body to regulate the flow of blood and activate the body’s Qi (pronounced “chee”), or energy. QI runs in very specific, interconnected channels in the body, much like the network of blood vessels.

Disease and pain occur when the Qi becomes stuck or out of balance. Activating the Qi with acupuncture needles removes these blockages and promotes natural healing, boosting immunity, and physical and emotional well-being, and over all function.

Karen Borla is trained in a variety of acupuncture techniques, including trigger point dry needling, TCM style, Tan’s balance method, Battlefield Acupuncture, facial rejuvination and auricular acupuncture.

Chinese Herbal Medicine

To further the healing process and enhance the benefits of acupuncture, herbal treatments – formulated according to classic techniques – may be prescribed.

Chinese herbal Medicine is a very sophisticated system, with over 400 medicinal substances to choose from including roots, leaves, bark, fruits, seeds, shells, resins, minerals and animal products. Single herbs are seldom used alone. Instead, a combination, or formula, is selected to treat imbalances and disease. With this sophisticated system, herbs can be chosen in combinations to specifically address each patient’s unique presentation and constitution.

Herbs can be prescribed in several different formats:

Raw, dried herbs: The most traditional form is raw, dried herbs that are cooked either by the patient, or at the pharmacy, into a decoction. This method gives the herbalist the greatest flexibility in choosing the most beneficial herbs to match a patient’s condition, and tends to be the strongest herbal therapy.

Another popular format is formulas that are made from herbs that have been cooked and dried. These are called granular or powdered extracts. They may also be tailored for each individual patient. This format may be preferable if the patient is not able to cook the herbs. All that is required is adding warm water to reconstitute the formula.

Ready-made formulas are also available in pill, tablet or capsule form. These cannot be specifically tailored to the patient, though good results can often be achieved by combining different ready-made formulas together. Cost and convenience are usually a high priority when ready-made formulas are chosen.

For some conditions, including pain and traumatic injury, herbs may also be prescribed for external use as soaks, washes, ointments, liniments poultices, or salves.

Chinese herbs are very safe when prescribed by a qualified herbalist. At Quan Yin Healing Arts, we use only reputable distributers of Chinese herbs. The raw herbal formula prescriptions are filled by Kamwo Herbal Pharmacy, NY, NY, and shipped directly to the patient. Granular extract formulas are manufactured by Kaiser Pharmaceuticals and filled and dispensed by Crane Herb Company in Massachusetts. They are also shipped directly to the patient. Please refer to the company websites on the links page for further information about herbal safety procedures.

In addition to a two month herbal mentorship in a hospital setting in China, Karen has studied with many master herbalists, including Ping Chan (injury and traumatology), Daniel Camburn (fertility and advanced gynecology), and Sharon Weizenbaum (a 2 year herbal mentorship program), throughout her 20 years of practice.

Karen Borla frequently combines acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine treatments, as they mutually enhance each other for certain conditions. Among the conditions frequently treated with combined acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine are infertility, menopausal issues, digestive issues, and the side effects of chemotherapy.

Cupping

Cupping is a therapy designed to stimulate the flow of blood and Qi within the superficial muscle layers. It is used for many ailments including sore muscles, tension, neck pain and respiratory illnesses, and for certain cases of infertility or menstrual pain. In this therapy, small glass cups are placed over specific areas of the body. A vacuum is created under the cup using heat to create suction. The cups may then be moved over an area, or left in one spot.   You may leave the office with purple or red marks where the cups were located. This slight discoloration is normal and a sign of good effect, and will dissipate within a day to a week.

Cupping promotes circulation of blood and fluids in the body, reducing pain and inflammation. Increased circulation allows the blood to flow into a stuck and painful area, taking nutrients to that area and allowing inflammation and toxins to be removed.

Many people experience a profound effect of pain relief and loosening of tightness, immediately after cupping.

Tui Na

Tui Na is a massage technique that moves Qi in various parts of the body. It is used to relieve muscle pain, tension and inflammation, and to heal injury. I may incorporate some Tui Na techniques as part of an acupuncture session.

Gua Sha

Gua Sha is another technique used to release muscle tension, tightness and constriction. A rounded tool is used to gently scrape or rub the skin over a problem area. Gua Sha feels similar to a deep massage. It may leave slight redness or deep purple mark which are a sign of positive effect and improved circulation. These marks usually diminish in a few days.

Heat Therapy

Heat therapy is used to warm the acupuncture points in order to enhance the healing process for certain conditions. Traditionally, moxibustion, a treatment that involves burning the herb mugwort on or around the acupoints was used. More frequently, Karen Borla uses an infrared heat lamp to warm points to avoid the smoke that is a byproduct of moxibustion therapy.